Thursday, November 24, 2016

Thanksgiving and some Eaton History all rolled into one!

The original founding families of Eaton were from Natick, among them is the Morse  family.  Captain Joseph Morse was part of the original group of settlers.  His group of Militia men included whites, free blacks and Praying Indians  I thought I would do a piece on that and history of early settlement of Massachusetts . 
The date of May 26, 1637, a mere 17 years after the settlement of Plymouth, the tensions between the Puritans and the Native Americans had become strained.  The very people who they stole the corn from on their landing and who showed them how to plant corn and other crops. as well as how to fish and hunt, were being exterminated by the English and Puritans who had now flocked to the shores of New England. 

The most militant of the Native tribes the Pequot has started warring against the white settlers who were pushing them off of their land.  So Militia and English troops set up and ambush on May 26, 1637.  The surrounded the Pequot settlement and using surprise burned the native fort to the ground.  The women, children, sick and elderly hid in their teepees and thus were burned alive.

Governor Bradford is quoted as saying: “It was a fearful sight to see them thus frying in the fire and the streams of blood quenching the same, and horrible was the stink there of: but the victory seemed a sweet sacrifice, and they gave the praise there of to God, who had wrought so wonderfully for them, thus to enclose their enemies in their hands and give them such a speedy victory!’

The history Channel named this as one of the 10 days that unexpectedly changed history, for the attitude of removal or cleansing would be our policy.  We regarded all those Native Americans who would not become civilized - near white as Devils who must be killed or driven out.

The Wampanoag’s and their famous Chief Massasoit, who were friends with Bradford and the Plymouth settlement, began to complain about the white settlers freely taking the crops and invading their land. In 1622 a militia Captain killed 8 friendly natives and impaled their sachem’s head on a pole in Plymouth.  Hostilities had begun and as the colony encroached more and more on their land, New England became a battleground.  The Wampanoag’s thought they could coexist with the whites but by the 1670’s Massasoit’s grandson Metacom, known to the English as King Phillip, began what would become known as King Phillip’s War. 

Metacom noted that The Wampanoag “had bine the first in doing good to the English and the English the first in doing rong.”

Metacom claimed that phony contracts were used to take large tracts of land from Indians who had been made drunk.

When a praying Indian who helped set up the Praying Indian Village of Natick was found murdered, three of Metacom’s followers were accused, found guilty and executed.  King Philips war was on…settlements, major towns and villages were burned and sacked until finally on August 12, 1676 he was killed…thus ending the King Phillip’s War. 

*It is noted that in Plymouth for that Thanksgiving they bought his head back and paraded it around town.  They Puritans thought it a sign from God of their righteous ownership of this new land...they the chosen people!


* Today Natick has a National Day of Mourning instead of Thanksgiving.  A monument was placed marking the genocide that took place at that time! 

Happy Thanksgiving!


Sunday, November 13, 2016

Pie Sale, Thanksgiving, the Museum and my Thank You's

This has been a busy week, as the museum group is getting ready for our upcoming Thanksgiving Pie & Bake Sale next Saturday the 19th.

 I have been very little help so far because of my injuries but I am whipping into shape.  Here I would like to thank all those who sent cards or words of encouragement and also to Kate & Mary Mahoney, Don Wheeler, Doug and Diane Chilson, Michele Kelly, Barb Keough, Cathy Nagle, and my brother and sister in law Fritz & Nola for their visits to the hospital. Broken ribs, broken collarbone, fingers, etc. are on the mend. (Still not typing too well!)

The Pie Sale has grown in size and we are lucky enough this year to use Jim Monahan’s little shop next to the Post Office again. Thanks Jim…. great location… with parking and space.

The pies and bake goods will also have items from our museum gift area and as always all proceeds go to upkeep of the museum which this year hosted a number of events, days open and did writing of history and history lectures.. 

The Friends of the Museum group is growing and we hope to have our 501 3c by next year. So think about joining with membership forms available at the event.


The sale will run from 10am until 3 pm so stop by and say hi and grab a bake good that you can use for Thanksgiving Dinner or as a gift….We will be looking for you!


The Old Town of Eaton Museum is housed in the oldest stone building in the Town of Eaton.


Video of another stone treasure in Eaton laying to waste...


Pie Sale, Thanksgiving, the Museum and my Thank You's

This has been a busy week, as the museum group is getting ready for our upcoming Thanksgiving Pie & Bake Sale next Saturday the 19th.

 I have been very little help so far because of my injuries but I am whipping into shape.  Here I would like to thank all those who sent cards or words of encouragement and also to Kate & Mary Mahoney, Don Wheeler, Doug and Diane Chilson, Michele Kelly, Barb Keough, Cathy Nagle, and my brother and sister in law Fritz & Nola for their visits to the hospital. Broken ribs, broken collarbone, fingers, etc. are on the mend. (Still not typing too well!)

The Pie Sale has grown in size and we are lucky enough this year to use Jim Monahan’s little shop next to the Post Office again. Thanks Jim…. great location… with parking and space.

The pies and bake goods will also have items from our museum gift area and as always all proceeds go to upkeep of the museum which this year hosted a number of events, days open and did writing of history and history lectures.. 

The Friends of the Museum group is growing and we hope to have our 501 3c by next year. So think about joining with membership forms available at the event.


The sale will run from 10am until 3 pm so stop by and say hi and grab a bake good that you can use for Thanksgiving Dinner or as a gift….We will be looking for you!


The Old Town of Eaton Museum is housed in the oldest stone building in the Town of Eaton.


Video of another stone treasure in Eaton laying to waste...


Pie Sale, Thanksgiving, the Museum and my Thank You's

This has been a busy week, as the museum group is getting ready for our upcoming Thanksgiving Pie & Bake Sale next Saturday the 19th.

 I have been very little help so far because of my injuries but I am whipping into shape.  Here I would like to thank all those who sent cards or words of encouragement and also to Kate & Mary Mahoney, Don Wheeler, Doug and Diane Chilson, Michele Kelly, Barb Keough, Cathy Nagle, and my brother and wife Fritz & Nola for their visits to the hospital. Broken ribs, broken collarbone, fingers, etc. are on the mend. (Still not typing too well!)

The Pie Sale has grown in size and we are lucky enough this year to use Jim Monahan’s little shop next to the Post Office again. Thanks Jim…. great location… with parking and space.

The pies and bake goods will also have items from our museum gift area and as always all proceeds go to upkeep of the museum which this year hosted a number of events, days open and did writing of history and history lectures.. 

The Friends of the Museum group is growing and we hope to have our 501 3c by next year. So think about joining with membership forms available at the event.


The sale will run from 10am until 3 pm so stop by and say hi and grab a bake good that you can use for Thanksgiving Dinner or as a gift….We will be looking for you!


The Old Town of Eaton Museum is housed in the oldest stone building in the Town of Eaton.


Video of another stone treasure in Eaton laying to waste...


Saturday, October 15, 2016

Life, Good Workers, Me and A Purposed Filled Life...

A special thank you to everyone that has kept me in his or her thoughts and prayers in this past year.  I assure that it has helped. I need you to keep it up if you can.  The world has thrown many obstacles in my way over the years but I keep bouncing back, so rest assured I will beat this one.

I had a visit from Reverend Don Wheeler yesterday and he pointed out something I have advocated all my life…whether it is building a house, running a Fair, making a museum, or putting on an event…we each have one job to do…and if we do that job well…right…or to the best of our ability, our efforts will be a success.  If working with others it will be considered by our maker and the world around us that “we lived a purpose filled life”.  That is something to ponder.

Just in being here in the hospital I was privy to watching it work.  Last night some of the workers were just marking time till they got go home.  I called them Daryl his other brother Daryl…they had little concern for how I was really feeling…then this morning after I lodged a complaint in came Shannon and Alicia…two workers who did their jobs well and who were able to broadcast this feeling to me their patient. They did their jobs well…and it showed.

A purpose filled life. They didn’t have to be doctors to help me... they only had to do their job, and it made a world of difference.


Barb and I did a video for the Rev. and his Labyrinth Project for the FBC of Syracuse… and I will include it here.


Thursday, September 22, 2016

Eaton, Fall Festival History Weekend, Lectures and Me...20 years of history!

Old Auction Barn on Rt. 26 in Eaton.
For me here in “Old” Eaton …Saturday, Sept. 24th… is a special day, it marks the 20th year I have been promoting a special Fall History Day.  I called it Fall Festival History Weekend.  It was my attempt to get people to tour the small lesser-known museums that could never be open every day of the week.  Those that you pass on your travels who never seem to be open when you drive by.

The day evolved to over 20 sites and museums across 3 counties and ran for 8 years.  During that time I had the pleasure of writing the history and meeting the people involved with all of the participating museums.  We became friends who met in our yearly lunch get –together.  I was so happy to see one of our original group this past week, a hard working historian and writer from Chenango County…Rose Wellman.

I promoted actively a day to cover the whole state where by societies and history museums would allow people to enter for free and would encourage families to celebrate history.  Well 20 years later it has evolved into an event that is national.  This Saturday is the Smithsonian Magazines History Day Live.  If you go to their website you can down load a ticket to visit any participating museum for free…and so the Old Town of Eaton Museum on 2776 River Road in Eaton will be open…for free…as always.
Old Town of Eaton Museum on River Road.
The museum, like almost all small museums needs money and so after a years hiatus of illness and troubles I will be speaking to promote history, raise money and be part of a small celebration we call Fall Festival History Weekend Revisited.

Of great interest is the fact that I will be delivering 2 lectures one on Thursday night at 7pm, and one on Saturday at 2pm.  The location of the talks will actually correspond with the first lecture on the lesser-known history of Madison County… history that you probably do not know.  The site is of not only national importance but also international importance… and yet we pass by it daily with out a second look.  It is here that Samuel Chubbuck invented something that brought the world together.  There are a number of sites like this that I think should be recognized and so the talk will cover some of Madison County’s.
So come down to Eaton the Hamlet… to the old Auction Barn on Rt. 26… and enjoy history, and take the time to visit the Old Town of Eaton Museum just a hundred yards or so away.



Support your local museums as they are the “Keepers of the Fire” for your community and are our personal link to the past.  If you can’t come out to buy a bake good or hear a lecture… send a donation.

Future generations looking to revisit their families past and the future community will thank you for it. 

Also remember everything that happens today is tomorrow’s history!